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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 04/30/2020 in all areas

  1. 10 points
    Very very Harsh Geko. I see a man, in an unenviable position, doing his utmost to balance the impossible tasks of trying to control the spread of a new novel virus - for which there is no treatment or preventive vaccine - whilst also trying to keep people in work, or funded if they can't work, and not allow the economy to be so badly damaged it will never recover. I also see an exasperated man trying to remain positive and polite when he is harangued by opposition MP's when they said they would work with him, and the media who seem intent on undermining every decision and take cognitive dissonance to a new level. This is a man who was in intensive care himself just a few weeks back, but his role means he has to be in the House - other MP's should respect him for that and maintain appropriate distancing. Edit - Cognitive Dissonance - a great term, thanks for using it Nigel in another thread
  2. 8 points
    As said above "Is all of this, Boris Johnson responsibility, all of it ?" Boris Johnson did not become Prime Minister until July 2019 some 10 months ago, so even this Guardian article cannot pin the previous 3 years and 2 months on him. Since becoming leader most people would remember and agree him battling against parliament and John Bercow not to mention all the turncoat remainers trying to usurp the referendum vote for Brexit and the BBC trying to scupper it. Throw in a few court battles from a Justice system overreaching themselves and you can see that the actual time Johnson had available was compressed into this area before the General Election held last December and then of course the battling again through Parliament to get ratification of Brexit complete by the end of January (remember that) so that's actually 4 months 2 weeks when Johnson was in control...but otherwise engaged. Why don't we try and allocate blame for something ...anything...to have been done by all these different factions mentioned above, other than Johnson. He appears to have been the only one fighting on the Uks side, and if these other complications had stood to the side and let the Brexit referendum decision apply, instead of trying to usurp the peoples will, it would have been done and dusted, and a trade deal been in place over 12 months ago without the constant carping..."we can't get one agreed in the time" ! Leaving time for other thorny decisions to be made. Mick Richards PS: Quoting the Guardian and Nesrine Malik is a tacit akin to throwing in the towel !
  3. 6 points
    "...What's in it for the BBC?..." In my teens my father was a bakery supervisor and he would get me up to do my homework at 5:30am. I always had the radio on and started listening probably 1960's, with Jack de Manio. Much on my working life was on the road and I listened to the radio news programs (Today) every morning. So I have had about sixty years of following the BBC News programs. I always felt that the news was an unbiased report of particular events, often not in either the UK's or the governments favour, but it always seemed "fair" and balanced. Since the nineties I have noticed a steady swing away from reporting events to only reporting events that suit a particular agenda and failing to have any mention of major international stories that do not suit that agenda, and there are many examples. I observe that the BBC is pushing an open-border, globalism, pro EU stance that denigrates anything worthwhile in the UK and the BBC appear to be exchanging good independent reporters and newscasters for those that only fit the BBC's decision to move away from reporting to opinion-forming. Why do they do this, what is in it for the BBC? It is very simple for any head to recruit and select those who share their opinions and slew society in a direction it would not necessarily be moving. Tonight for example the BBC invited Sarah Wollaston, a prominent remainer to comment on the latest Coronavirus briefing, on at least four occasions she did not answer the questions put to her but repeated her anti-Cummings stance, but as a GP she should have been well placed to provide an objective assessment of the briefing but chose not to do so. Balance in reporting on the BBC is no longer about allowing a mixed range of informed commentary and alternative suggestions but about sniping and undermining whilst offering nothing constructive to the melting pot. Someone high up in the BBC is fashioning a political tool to steer public opinion, and it stinks. Alan
  4. 6 points
    As per John Morrison I sometimes hear the journalist say "..people are complaining/objecting/up-in-arms..." (perm and one from three) and I wonder if it is their mum & dad , or colleagues and editor as they will have had no time to take soundings from the wider public. Not untrue, just a ruse to slant a story to meet an agenda. I believe that BBC are still out there trying to manipulate public opinion to get Brexit reversed by; Removing Mr Cummings Discrediting Boris Johnson Get a Brexit delay approved by EU Brexit just dies, along with democracy. Why no reporting of reducing Covid death numbers - or is that a good news story which does not play well with the objectives of the end game ? Why so little reporting of Stephen Kinnock visiting his father on his 78 th birthday 150 miles away? Alan
  5. 6 points
  6. 6 points
    A milestone day today: many of you may recall I had a stroke in late June last year, and because I also had a number of absence seizures, the last on 2 July, I voluntarily surrendered my driving licence to the DVLA for a year. Well, although navigating the reapplication process on the DVLA website and completing the various forms has been a nightmare, the DVLA don’t make it easy! The DV1 form has been completed, along with the correct (!!) medical questionnaire, supporting medical evidence and a supporting letter from my employer (Army HQ Andover) the tracked package was posted off yesterday and received by the DVLA today, so all being well the DVLA will expedite my reapplication and I will be driving my TRs from 2 July, and riding my motorbikes a few weeks later; I promised Bev I wouldn’t jump straight back on the bikes until I regained at least some modicum of roadcraft in the cars first…… The next Milestone will be returning to work, hopefully in June or July. Fingers crossed! Cheers, Andrew
  7. 6 points
    Sadly, that's exactly where the UK finds itself. The Westminster government attempts a grown up conversation about the way forward and the media respond with juvenile points scoring attempts, as do some of the devolved assembly politicians. Nigel
  8. 6 points
    I think that is a bit harsh. The guy was in intensive care just a few weeks ago. I suspect he didn't quite get the words right about "going back to work tomorrow" - i.e. today. I suspect he meant/ or meant to say we would start the process of getting people in certain areas of the economy back to work today with more detail/guidance on that coming out today and in the next few days/weeks. For weeks people, the media, businesses and opposition politicians have been asking for a road map to recover from lockdown. All have said trust us to use common sense and trust us to use our intelligence to do the right thing as we remobilise the economy - yet now as the first steps start to be discussed, all people can do is complain! Watching the news programs this morning I was getting quite angry at many commentators and interviewee's comments. If those people put as much effort into thinking about how to do the right thing as they seem to be into finding fault - then we will be fine.
  9. 5 points
    Hi all Yes sold, deposit paid so it will change hands. The new owner has got an awful lot of car for the money and the history and provenance of EBW656A is really special. It will be great to see it out being used and also have a have a new TR4 owner out rallying. Thanks all for your interest. Regards Tony
  10. 5 points
    I saw a clip where the media were pushing a shoving each other with DC asking them to step back and stay 2m apart. Clearly social distancing rules don't apply to the media. The other hypocritical issue I have with the media is when Laura Kuenessberg and friends are standing outside No.10 or the Palace of Westminster talking to the camera, not interviewing anybody. Not only a pointless journey but I bet they also have a cameraman, soundman, director and possibly a make-up/hair person. I bet they travel together. Whilst standing there in close proximity they are criticising others for breaking lockdown rules. They are not key workers and the piece to camera can be done from home using a static camera. My lovely wife tells me off for shouting at the tv news, mainly aimed at the behaviour of the media and their puerile, negative questions, I must learn to chill. Mick
  11. 5 points
    I get increasingly frustrated at the BBC "News" reporting. Watching the lunchtime news now and they run a story on the tracing app on IOW - but focus hugely on the 'data security risk' when at the Press conference yesterday, and again on the morning news the experts and Matt Hancock explained that nothing will be stored anywhere other than on the users phone unless and until someone needs to contact the NHS then it will be shared with the NHS. I don't know why the Government bother with the daily press conference when they get asked all the same questions by the BBC presenters/journalists on every subsequent news program. Another news item on aircraft overcrowding cites an 'anonymous source' regarding issues on BA flights. This is lazy journalism - go and find out, ask Aer Lingus why they are even flying for example. BBC News has become BBC "Wild speculation and scaremongering" and has been so for some while, sadly.
  12. 4 points
    Mrs McDonald has been busy today making a cake for our private VE75 garden picnic tomorrow, just me and her. Dave McD
  13. 4 points
    Mick You have just surprised me, shouting at the TV is definitely not something I would normally associate you with, having spent time with you at meeting, where others may have got heated you appeared calm. I too feel the behaviour of the pack of journalists is more likely to endanger lives with their close proximity to each other let alone those they feel they have the right to descend upon. Dominic Cummings got in his car quietly one evening and drove with his family to a place where he felt was safest. The bias reporting on the television and the manner in which they conduct themselves I find rude at best to outright offensive. The press make a big play on DC hasn’t abided by the rules/guidelines, well it’s clear from the photo above they are breaking them every day and forcing other to do the same, the hypocrisy is glaring and like Mick frustrated, I have so far refrained from shouting at the TV but on more than one occasion taken large breaths to calm myself. When I think of what we were in the 60 and 70s pioneers with a media so positive that stood for fairness with a broadcasting net work to be proud the envy of many. To have descended to this, trial by media, rude, offensive, demanding and irresponsible, I am not sure if just shouting is the answer.
  14. 4 points
    I also have a son with autism. Lots of people have dependants who have special needs, often severe ones. But Independent journalist Jim Moore put it better than I can, in response to Michael Gove: "The thing is Mike, I’m disabled and type 1 diabetic. My key worker wife was on the verge of hospitalisation with Covid while I was seriously ill with it. My son (12) is autistic. My daughter is 9. We managed the situation without our relatives or travelling to Durham.” Sorry for my tone, but I'm starting to get quite angry with this myself, which is unlike me. I'd best shut up now. Nigel
  15. 4 points
    Drove to Barnard Castle today. I’ve been having trouble with my eyesight recently, and I was advised it was the best place to go to get it tested. Charlie.
  16. 4 points
    I have absolutely no problem with him going home to drop off his kids with his parents when he was ill i would do the same. what I do have a problem with is the evidence that is emerging that he has been seen else where .... I also have a big problem with double standards from those in power who like to tell us what to do and do the complete opposite this is nothing to do with Brexit politics ......this is about abuse of power and "I'm alright "attitude AND...... My son in laws best mate / best man at his wedding was admitted to a hospice with a brain tumour. Both my daughter and son in law observed the lockdown. Both were distraught . They did not visit .He died.....left two young children . He was 30 years old . My son in law was one of ten who could attend the funeral. My daughter could not. She is till upset about this. So when I see double standards and a total hypocrite in action.....yes I do get bloody angry. Do as I say....not as I do.
  17. 4 points
    Thanks for the photos, Paul. That 2010 IWE at Malvern was a truly marvellous occasion, so I'm going to paste here my report from TR Action, which had a high level shot of all the cars plus drivers etc across 2 pages. “THE WORKS TRIUMPHS” AT MALVERN Mervyn Parkes, our Treasurer and the man who rounds up cars to appear in the arena at our International Weekends, thought we needed to do something rather special for the IWE in our 40th Anniversary year – a display of as many ex-Works TRs as we could find, together with folks who used them in anger in the competition era. The organisation of this had to be a team effort, so Mike Ellis and I were sucked in, later joined by Bob Rowland. Some 100 invitations were issued by post and e-mail at the beginning of May, and the arm-twisting started! Inevitably, some people had prior engagements and – with considerable regret – had to decline. I think I shall be proved right if I claim this to have been a unique occasion, for where else could one have seen such a collection of ex-Works Triumphs, consisting of 18 TRs and four others? Added to that, we had some 20 of the people who had been involved with these cars between 1954 and the 1980s, in the rôles of driver, navigator, mechanic and competitions management. The big surprise was the phone call from Arwed Otto in Germany on the Wednesday preceding the weekend – he told me that he intended to bring the second TRS (his son, Mike, was bringing 927HP), but that I must keep it a secret as he wanted to surprise Mike – and he certainly did when they met close to Malvern! We had two other cars from the Continent: Pascal Quirynen from Belgium, with OVC276, and Jim Pratt from Sweden, with VWK610. It was especially pleasing to see Bob West’s VVC673, for it had been sitting in the back of his garage for twelve years until the invitation arrived; then it was dragged out and, from that point onwards, each e-mail reported further progress, the final push being when it went to Neil Revington for final fettling and its MOT - marvellous! Neil Fender and Steve Rockingham brought their cars which had been competing at Silverstone on the Friday, and were competing there again on the Sunday. It was great to see Ken Wakefield’s WVC249 and, although all agreed it needed some attention, it attracted a great deal of interest! The final line-up was: TR2 OVC276 Pascal Quirynen (Belgium) PDU20 Peter Harding driving for owner, David Wenman OKV777 Geoff Stamper PKV374 Jan Pearce TR3 SRW992 Stephen Skinner SKV656 Neil Fender TR3A VWK610 Jim Pratt (Sweden) VVC673 Bob West WVC247 Geoff Stamper WVC249 Ken Wakefield TRS 927HP Mike Otto (Germany) 928HP Arwed Otto (Germany) TR4 3VC Tony Sheach/Gareth Firth/Neil Revington 4VC Ian Cornish 6VC Neil Revington TR7 OOM513R Brian Kershaw TR7V8 SJW548S Steve Rockingham SJW533S David Maslen Vitesse 6002VC Andrew Martin Spitfire ADU1B Mark Field 2.5PI XJB304H Pat Walker KNW798 Pat Walker Apart from TR3S (none of which is known to have survived) and Dolomite, we had a representative from each model of Triumph Works cars. Our special guests (in alphabetical order, with their original role in the Triumph Works entries in parentheses) were: Don Barrow (Navigator), Tom Blackburn (Private Entrant), Mike Broad (Navigator), Willy Cave (Navigator), Ron Crellin (Navigator), Brian Culcheth (Navigator/Driver), Graham Elsmore (Driver), Dave Gleed (Mechanic), Den Green (Mechanic), Robert Grounds (son of Driver Lola Grounds), Stuart Harrold (Navigator), Simo Lampinen (Driver), Harris Mann (Designer of TR7), Yvonne Mehta (Navigator and widow of Shekhar Mehta), Brian Moylan (Mechanic), Bill Price (Team Management), Graham Robson (Navigator/Team Management), David Stone (Navigator), Stuart Turner (Navigator), Mike Wood (Navigator). Although Yvonne was never a member of the Triumph Works effort, she is a considerable Navigator in her own right and she was kind enough to collect Simo from Heathrow and return him there afterwards – and nowadays she navigates for Steve Rockingham in his V8, telling Steve he needs to find more power! The marvellous Willy Cave, still navigating at the age of 84, had a nasty skiing accident earlier this year (torn muscles and ligaments), but is now walking unaided and was brought by Bill Price (definitely no wrong-slotting on the run to Malvern!). Our splendid Honorary President provided introductions in Wye Hall in the morning, and after lunch, all the cars, owners and guests were herded into the arena for some high-level photos, followed by Stuart Turner and Simo Lampinen cutting one of Jean Parkinson’s special (and delicious) celebratory cakes. Then Robson and Redway introduced the cars from each era, talking about their competition records, and speaking to the owners and those who had been involved in the days when Triumph were using them! As a pretty mean navigator himself (4th in the 1962 Monte Carlo Rally and 1st in the 1965 Welsh Rally, amongst other successes) and author of “The Works Triumphs”, Graham illuminated the proceedings with his detailed and intimate knowledge of the history of Triumph, of motor sport and of the people involved. Afternote: Graham has pointed out that the centenary of Triumph is not that far away - perhaps something similar might be organised for that? I would be happy to assist a (younger!) member organise such an event as part of an IWE - I have all my files on my PC. Ian Cornish
  18. 4 points
    Here's some photographs from IWE 2010, showing both cars indoors and outdoors though I seem to have more of 928HP outdoors, including a short movie though you may have to click on the link to my Flickr page for it to work, or maybe not, Paul
  19. 4 points
    Yesterday I took a drive along the coast road between St. Just and St. Ives , (B3306), here in Cornwall. This is one of the Cornwall Group’s favourite roads. Here is a short excerpt from the video of the trip. I’m sorry but the quality of the video and audio are not what I normally expect from YouTube but the flavour is there. It was great to get some fresh air. By the way, I can assure you that my speed was not as excessive as it might appear. Rodders.
  20. 4 points
    A bit of exercise for me and the car,Haldon forest south of Exeter today
  21. 4 points
    Of course we want people to visit the Lakes. I just feel that the Government has jumped the gun and it is a bit too soon. I never thought I'd agree with Nicola Sturgeon but I do - at the moment. I certainly don't underestimate the intelligence of people on this Forum but I have seen the crass stupidity of people (in my area) blatantly ignoring the social distancing advice from day one and still continuing to do so. Sadly, common sense is becoming less common these days. Only this morning I saw about half a dozen teenagers chatting at the entrance to the park (they were only distancing by a couple of feet). I had to ask them to move so that my partner and I could leave the park. They may not feel endangered but, being in the vulnerable age group, I do. Should you come to this area once this is over you would be made most welcome and, indeed, you would be welcome to visit my home where we could talk TRs and maybe meet other members of the very active and friendly Cumbria group. In fact I have no worries about sensible people visiting the area now and following Boris' advice but I worry that everyone will arrive at once and many may choose not to follow the rules. As you say, time will tell. There is no real problem if everybody behaves sensibly Andy M
  22. 4 points
    I need to strongly second what Stuart is saying here. Properly set up and if necessary rebuilt lever arm shocks can work very well indeed on a 4a. The difference comes when you are doing seriously hard driving (ie racing or rallying) when the oil in the lever shocks start heats up considerably because the pistons inside the lever shocks are moving much more. This simply won’t happen on the road under normal, even spirited, driving conditions in my experience. Getting shocks rebuilt well by someone who knows what they are doing with shimming and piston spring rates is everything - putting thicker oil in is pretty temporary and some might say shortens the life of the shock as the seals take more load. Choose your rebuilder carefully - I also go to Derek Stevson. There is a twin valve adjustable DAS10 shock available but hard to find and those can be fitted pretty much ‘bolt on’ to the TR IRS chassis. This gives a MASSIVE improvement to hand,in and can be tuned depending on what you need, have a rear ARB etc etc whilst still seemingly working within the bounds of chassis rigidity (or lack of) so works very well indeed, but come at another order of cost. You CAN make a set of telescopic shocks work really well, but this needs to be accompanied by a lot of properly thought through chassis stiffening to deal with all the extra loads and twisting induced into the IRS chassis and this sort of arrangement does indeed change the character of the car. You then get into the process of chasing out all the foibles, so having done this myself and worked my way through it all I’d suggest that you need go into it eyes open and expect a load of work and trial and error, and this is a further order of cost and time by the time it’s done. My experience is that the effect of bolting on a set of telescopics on brackets ranges from not much differences to awful, ie not particularly better. I returned my 4a to nicely rebuilt DAS10’s and everything else well maintained after a lot of playing around, but the chassis stiffening remained and was really good. I would also suggest as Stuart has that you consider all the various bushes and links in the IRS and at the back end, driveshafts and UJ’s etc as all of the above have an effect on well an IRS car handles. Hope the above is useful. You can do a lot to make a 4a handle well in standard form at moderate cost, so I’d humbly suggest you try that approach first. Regards Tony
  23. 4 points
    Looks to me like a picture of the PM practicing individual isolation, sat at the dispatch box listening intently to what is being said by other MPs via a tele link. Words conjured up to me... attentive, alone, briefed with docs spread around him. What words do you see ? Mick Richards
  24. 4 points
    John I too am old enough and fortunate enough to have watched both these journalists in action. A single journalist asking the same question in an interview 12 times because he interviewee fails to answer is one thing. Having 12 separate journalists asking the the same question to get the same answer is another. Hence my original thought observation. Their deaths here and abroad is the result of a shocking virus, which has been transported around the world. I wonder here if in your informed opinion you honestly believe that, had those members previous running the Labour Party or even those current running the Labour Party, been in Government they would be or would have been better placed to take us though this pandemic. I recall a note left by a minister, having just been removed from Government by the people, to a incoming Tory Government.
  25. 4 points
    It would be funny if t wasn't so serious John. All those papers in your post, and the media generally, pressed so hard for a lockdown - now they can't wait to criticise and undermine said lockdown by second guessing the next steps and encouraging all and sundry to break the rules over this upcoming weekend. I bet we will be inundated with motorbikes again in this part of Sussex over the next few days.
  26. 4 points
    I don't think anyone is suggesting the BBC are anything like the examples given John, but you have to admit - they prefer the sound of their own voice to any answer that a Politician, Scientist, or anyone is trying to give, and they constantly seek to inflame with speculation, rather than just report the news.
  27. 4 points
    Interesting question. And a long response from me... As the Cold War nuclear threat receded, a number of European countries maintained a civil defence/civil protection (there are some differences in mandate) organisations. In part that was because of ongoing natural disaster risks, particularly in Southern Europe, but also reflecting a desire to keep being able to 'offer' non-military alternatives for national service conscription. I used to work in the disaster relief 'business' and so got to know a lot of CD/CP folks from European and other countries because they were often sent as part of national capacities to respond to major disasters around the world. Many although not all actually had fire and rescue service backgrounds. Their competences I would say varied quite a bit but for certain roles they were often very effective especially in the early stages of a response where operational 'push' and establishing and delivering on clear physical goals were most important. Those same countries, indeed the majority of countries in Europe and the world, maintain some kind of national emergency management agency (FEMA in the USA is probably the most well known), and the civil defence/protection bodies are usually subordinate to that. The UK is very unusual in not having either, and that's probably because we are so un-prone to natural disasters. Instead, we have a small unit in the Cabinet Office called the Civil Contingencies Secretariat but it's really just a policy unit. The UK model for emergency response has long been based on a command-and-control concept (Bronze, Silver, Gold levels) and very heavily devolved to local authority level. It kind of assumes that emergencies will be handled locally and escalated up as necessary. But I've always felt that has severe potential weaknesses in a major, national level event and the lack of a well resourced and emergency-savvy NDMA to staff a big disaster is an obvious weakness. Also, the UK Government is in general a very centralised set of institutions, and the doctrine around emergency response tends to assume that central government will gather information, analyse it behind closed doors, and then allocate resources to its own entities to respond. That is a rather old fashioned model and tends to ignore non-government capacities such as charities/NGOs, businesses, and others who often end up being an important part of a major emergency response. The part of government that would understand that aspect, the Department for International Development (DFID) which is one of the world's most experienced and competent humanitarian funders, has no role in domestic emergencies. That's unlike many countries in which the NDMA and civil protection agencies have both national and international mandates and hence transfer learning both ways. I'm talking here mainly about physical emergencies rather than health crises, but many of the principles and issues still apply. Nigel
  28. 4 points
    https://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/1277935/bbc-licence-fee-council-tax-band-cost-value-of-house-property I can can see that if this gains any traction the people will not stand for it. A bit like we pay more for our water and sewage as the tax band increases. The BBC is outdated and no longer fit for purpose, massive salaries, mediocre actors, failed at everything else pundits with a leftist agenda. What the hell does Broadband have to do with keeping the BBC afloat, or the value of your property costs you a larger fee to the |BBC. I don't watch live TV in any case and no one in the family does either. Is this going to be slipped in while we are on lockdown, like over reaching Police powers which seem to be being interpreted differently by different Police men and women. Is surveince by drones going to become the norm? Rod
  29. 4 points
    Some say the BBC is no longer an independent broadcasting company interested in unbiased reporting. I understand a recent complaint was made that the doctors interviewed regarding PPE were hand picked having been or are Labour activists. If this is confirmed. Has the BBC become politically manipulating, instead of unbiased? If so perhaps they should not be the countries funded Broadcasting company.
  30. 4 points
    Well we had a great day out today with our end of the drive static car show. This was in aid of Classics for Carers, we had a few people stop and have a look and read the info board. Mike Redrose group
  31. 4 points
    The previous position and statement were provided by our best medical minds and acted upon by the government, if the scientific thought process changes or the medical advice provided changes I expect the government to take notice of it and change their minds. ...What do you do ? Mick Richards
  32. 3 points
    Develop it did. This lunchtime the car finally rolled off the ramps. So I ended up replacing the dash top pad, righthand knee pad, re-covering the grab handle, sorting out/tidying the wiring behind the dash. make a new manogamy centre console The offside rear corner of the floor pan, bottom of wheel arch, back end of the sill all rust cut away and new metal welded back in. The offside front corner of the floor pan, front end of the sill, bottom of the wing - a;; rust cut away and new metal welded in. The front wing also got a respray. This afternoon the GB will be removed so that I can try and cure an oil leak at the GB/Od adaptor plate. With the GB out I will remove the heater. Flush the matrix and install a new fan - AndyR100's thread This covid has a liot to answer for. Roger
  33. 3 points
    Lucky you used to wear your nylon stockings to work then Bob.... at least you could give it a go? Is that why it was known as “the swinging 60’s”?
  34. 3 points
    +1 The BBC no longer content in reporting new, they make reference to those In Government and in power making the rules and breaking them, while they are attemptIng to manipulate the public to their way of thinking. A balanced view no longer a priority It seems.
  35. 3 points
  36. 3 points
    Yes, I have a steel roof on my Honeybourne rear section. Stuart.
  37. 3 points
    John, DC is supposed be a very clever man. If what you say is true ' Payback for previous actions" is what is happening, he is not such a clever man after all....is he ? if those that advise/ govern followed what they told the rest if us to do...they would not be in this kind of mess DC finds himself in. Practise what you preach and no one can stick the knife in can they ?
  38. 3 points
    I think the alternative views are just as important Ian, it helps the rounded argument which allows all of us to make a decision based upon likely outcome. Taking an intake of VitD3 which is of the same order as that recommended by the US which has the reputation of being the most litigious country in the world, and lawyers prowl health clinics looking for prey is not in my view going to be very risky. Otherwise they wouldn't go anywhere near these figures and is a likely reason why they have reduced their recommendation down to 4,000iu as against the 40,000iu at which they have completed tests and found no observable side effects. Mick Richards
  39. 3 points
    Nope, added a strip of steel under the original coil mounting holes, extending to the rear with 2 more holes for the 2nd coil. Bob. (exactly the same as Hamish - great minds etc !)
  40. 3 points
    Here's a photo of 929 HP at the 1981 Donnington TR Weekend. How time flies, this was my first TR Weekend! Derek
  41. 3 points
    "Currently unavailable" apparently, H. Girl from customer support said the tech boys were looking into it, and they're hoping to have it sorted the moment someone invents the internet. Deggers
  42. 3 points
    Took the Swallow out, but only across the yard. The virus will be long gone by the time it ready for the road. Cheers Richard
  43. 3 points
    Well ..got the test results back today. We are both "negative". Relieved to say he least, but still means we can still get the bloody thing. Now...seeing as I've still got a sore throat , headache and have about much get up and go as a asmatic flea...summer cold/ mild flu ?? Thanks for the messages of good will etc. Much appreciated. Booking a celebratory pick up cod and chips for tonight !!
  44. 3 points
    Handy tool to use when replacing valve stem seals. Remove rocker shaft then pressurise individual combustion chamber to hold valves onto their seats allowing you to remove springs and collets then replace stem seals. Saves removal of cylinder head.
  45. 3 points
    Yet another well researched and written article by Wayne giving us an insight into the role of WW2 on the fortunes or not of Standard and Triumph. Well done. Mick https://www.tr-register.co.uk/article/2020/05/0232/The-Standard-Motor-Companys-crucial-role-in-WW2-the-rebirth-of-Triumph
  46. 3 points
    There's a coast road out there with my name on it . . . with a beach, a BBQ, and a sunset at the end of it. Can't wait. Cheers, Deggers
  47. 3 points
  48. 3 points
    Its not completely clear, but I wonder if your upper fulcrum pins are wrongly oriented...its a common issue as the workshop manual uses a TR4 example and they switched the orientation on the IRS chassis...it goes the 'illogical' way round: I borrowed this photo from http://www.nonlintec.com/tr4a/suspension/#fulcrumpin there's a section on Fulcrum Pin Orientation about 1/3 down that page.
  49. 3 points
    At last there seems to be some good news regarding the availability of COVID-19 PPE. I would like to know if anyone out there can tell me if I should go for the six cylinder option or the four?
  50. 3 points
    It has been established that a new strain has passed from Bats to the Chinese Black & White bear. They are expecting a Pandademic Roger (sorry)
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