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    RogerH

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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 06/16/2019 in all areas

  1. 4 points
    I am from Scotland ( falkirk)I have owned my 6 for 23 years. I have now lived I Croatia for 20 years and drove the car thier 15 years ago where it now resides. Yes, still on British plates. So here are so.e photos of it out and about in Croatia. Club rallies and just enjoying the coast roads. Enjoy. 2014-05-30
  2. 3 points
    It takes time, patience and originality to achieve a result like this. But that's enough about her tattoos . . . . Cheers, Deggers
  3. 2 points
    Yes we must , I set off Thursday night in intermittent rain ,then I got to Sandiway lights the heavens opened so a sharp left into the Shell service station, to put the roof up, the wipers actually work in this TR6, a couple of beers in the pub then set off home with the cassette player, playing and the heater on. Takes me back 40 years Cheers Gordon
  4. 2 points
    Perhaps we could get POGO to don a few tattoos., and make a UK clip. I love the "Linseed Special"
  5. 2 points
    Pleasant drive in the TR6 to have lunch at the Crab Shell in Kingsbridge Devon. South Hams equals anywhere on the Med especially when the weather is like today.
  6. 2 points
    Hi Andrew, having seen the MG cover I'll pop into Moss and have a look and then try to reproduce on a 4A cover Roger
  7. 2 points
    . Brilliant.., just absolutely bloody brilliant ! I was invited to the Essex branch meeting of the TR register club, held at the Alba pub, Copford, near Colchester on Thursady evening. I only knew one gentleman (Rich) there, but was made as welcome as any old friend might have hoped for. BIG Thank You to all there. I'm not sure exactly how many TR's were there but I believe there was a TR2, a TR3A, a few TR4's, a couple of TR4A's (which is what I'm trying to buy) and then a pair of TR5's, perhaps half a dozen TR6's and just one TR8.. ^ the car sneaking into the photo’s background to the left is not a Triumph. I can't imagine what sort of person drives one of those to a TR club meeting.! OK I admit to it.. it's my Citroen Ami-Super. ^ Two TR5's parked here along the road. And the equally gorgeous red car parked on the grass is a TR4A with Surrey hardtop fitted. When Rich introduced me to the owner, Mike, as being someone who was buying one, he (Mike) looked up at my broad 6'-5" stature and simply said "you want to try it ?" Well naturally I assumed he meant to sit in the car for size .. "Thanks ..yes that would be great, I would.” Then he handed me the keys and said something to the effect of "better take her down the road then" ! ..and set about adjusting the driver’s seat as far back as it would for me. Well to be honest I had a bit of difficulties getting in. Surprisingly, it wasn't a lack of headroom with the Surrey top on, but it was managing to get my legs and feet in. This car is fitted with Mazda MX5 shallow-bucket seats in leather. In retrospect ; very comfortable and supportive, but these were limited by the runners not going back as far as they might have been. The only way it was possible for me to get in was to exaggeratedly twist my knee under and the around the steering wheel ..fortunately a smaller diameter leather-rimmed one with a nice grip, but unfortunately with very shallow dish so it seems tighter to the dashboard. My leg had to fit between the wheel and the gearbox tunnel's H frame bracing ..and then to press the clutch fully to the floor as I lowered myself into the seat. There was no room in that car for me to slip my size-twelve brogues around the side of or under any pedal. I grabbed and pulled my right knee up towards my chest to clear the relatively short sill. It more easily unfolded again down around the wheel. Once installed I could barely move. Conversely, Mike slipped into the passenger seat as easily as if it were his favourite slippers. My mind zapped with unspoken thoughts of whether it would be possible., let alone responsible for me to even try and drive this immaculate TR4A on a public highway.? The sole of my right shoe was almost exactly the same width as the gap between the brake pedal and the outside face of foot well (Rhd car). And to lift my foot off the clutch was to pull my vastus lateralis tight into the corner of H-frame and the dashboard. Ok, it might just be possible to drive the car ..but what would happen in an emergency situation, would I be able to get a foot onto that brake. ? I later discovered this car has a USB socket fitted just under the dash where my left leg needed to be. Mike uses it for a digital ammeter, but for me it looses an inch or two of space into that corner. My right foot would lift only as far as the pedal was off ..only by ankle movement. Thankfully the throttle movement is relatively short travel. Still that amount of lift is just sufficient to then slip the foot sideways and across to the brake. With the seat in that position, the steering wheel was possibly 12 - 14" off the Michelin tyre I wear ..so not exactly a straight-arm driving position for me. And my right was tight against the padded-roll capping along the top of TR4A doors. I'm not sure Mike appreciated quite how tightly I was installed, but from his perspective I must have seemed like an old cloth sack over-filled with expanding foam. Looking on the bright side of things - I wasn't likely to slide about around corners. ! Here I was face to face with the TR4A's beautiful wooden dashboard and chrome rimmed 5" speedo and rev counter, each situated immediately in front of the driver, with minor instruments clustered central to the car with the black row of switches and ignition below. With a blip of throttle, the motor burst into life. Two and a quarter litres of 4-cylinder long-stroke, and a slightly sporty camshaft - the orchestra was glorious. The exhaust a nicely rounded tone, with a powerfully strong and discernible beat. Very nice indeed. It's been 25 years since I owned / drove a Triumph TR4 ..and momentarily I forgot about their fly-off handbrake. Nevertheless with that politely corrected I set to ease Mike's immaculate car forward across the grass. Of course with most of the TRR group gathered immediately behind us ..watching and listening, with ankle movement only and it being an unfamiliar car.. I stalled it. “It likes a few revs” Mike reassured me. Restarted (..oh I do love the way these engines burst into life) and revs just slightly raised ..the car smoothly eased its way across the grass. Remarkably controllable, easy and compliant, I followed Mike’s prompt and guided her down to the next driveway. Very tentatively I poked the car’s long bonnet out into the road so that I might see around the row of parked cars, and then we were onto the road. I looked to where I was to go and depressed the volume control and we were there. No drama just a firm push of acceleration through the comfortable armchair ..and instant transportation. To where I looked from where I was, every straight and every corner, road positioning was faultless. I wasn’t even thinking, the car just moved itself in an unprecedented manner - reassuring, precise, super quick, fabulous acoustics and yet extraordinarily comfortable. I’ve heard the impression “just think and it would take you there” ..but this was a just matter of looking ..without even time to consciously think, and we were conveyed.! There was no hint of the car’s handling, chassis or rear axle being upset, nor of under or over-steering, nor brakes not doing exactly what they were meant to ..so progressively, despite the road’s undulations, adverse cambers and the sometimes increasingly tightening corners of this tiny little Suffolk back road to nowhere. This car was utterly exhilarating. Now into my sixties, I’ve owned and otherwise driven a number of very nice motorcycles and cars. In fact as a (very much) younger man I used to design, build and drive very quickly, sport cars with a super low c. of g. and a terrific power-to-weight ratio ..and then I moved on (?) to driving decent production cars. Most memorable / favourites were the 850 Norton Commando (motorcycle), the 1147cc MkII Spitfire (car), a 998cc Mini Clubman, a 3.3ltr 7-series BMW, a 911 Porsche, and a few (now classic) Jaguars. And of course I’m well enough versed with (..what used to be) modern cars of the 90’s and hereafter. But somewhere along the line I’d lost the joy of driving. I put this down to restrictive speed limits and traffic, boring motorways, and otherwise sub-conscientiously recognizing that I must have lost the touch in my old age. But after driving Mike’s TR4A I instantly realized that its the cars which have most changed. I’m still that same foolish young man inside this greying outer persona. As a self made businessman I went up-market in the type of car I drove, and as technology and design moved on, the more modern car became so capable and yet so insular that the driver in me was designated passenger doing little more than avoiding other users and giving directions. In truth these modern cars don’t handle and steer so very well as Mike’s 1960’s TR. Indeed their lack of feedback, the roll and easily induced tyre squeal, and the vagueness of the steering and unsupportive seats necessitate you back-off to a safe and controllable, sensible place. In terms of top speed, fuel economy, highway comfort, safety and reliable practicality, ingress and exit - they are a best compromise. But man ! ..they are also nanny state mind-numbingly soul less. From my admittedly short drive, it seems to me that the TR4A can be all absorbing to drive, as you feel everything but the discomfort of vibration and nasty noises. But that ‘feel’ is a direct feedback to the driver. Each and every very slight nudge in the seat of your pants or to your leg, shoulder, or finger tip ..caused by road irregularities or change in direction triggers an instantaneous response of subtle correction to the steering &/or the throttle. There’s no thinking involved it’s purely interactive (although that’s probably too modern a word for it) ..but whatever the word is, there’s a connection to what’s going on at every instant. That’s not easy or relaxed driving, but it sure as hell is FUN. And the car is not so powerful (..as some I have experienced) which toys with you for control. But still., it’s more than adequate for spirited driving, and it looks after you. It let’s you know what’s happening in a calm and collective manner, to trigger your reflex response. And that’s positively stimulating. We returned to the Alma (public house) and the car very quietly sauntered across the grass, back to the TR party. If she were a mare then I think she’d have given a last shake of her mane. I can barely remember such a great drive. I want one ..and I want to head out to find many, many miles of still-unspoilt roads. Getting out of the car seemed much easier than my getting in. And as I later pointed out to Rich, I was surprised that headroom and visibility were not an issue for me, even though the roof was in place. First impressions were that the interior of the car was rattle free, pleasantly quiet of mechanical and/or wind noise and very comfortable, although I suspect I would have liked more room if I were to be stuck in a summer-hot traffic jam. Massive thanks to Mike for his generously allowing me to experience a superb TR4A from the driver’s seat. It reaffirms my decision to own one. Only now I’m a little less patient.! But the story doesn’t end there.. Mike suggested I ask Rich if I might possibly sit in his equally gorgeous ’62 TR4, which is fitted with later (slightly deeper padded) seats ..by way of direct comparison of the seating positions and the fact that the roof was down. Rich was engrossed in conversation but half an hour later cleared a cardboard box out from behind the driver’s seat and invited me to try it. Phew, I was being blown away by these guys kindness to me. As I approached the car he handed me the keys. ..Again I could only have hoped to be allowed to sit in the car, to try it for size, but no, he had placed the box on the passenger seat and encouraged me to take the car for a spin. WOW ! on my own ? “without you ?” accompanying me ? I was anxious. This was huge responsibility. I soon settled into the driver’s seat. With its full size steering wheel it was even further a twisted knee to get my leg around the wheel but without a roof I could stand taller and with the seat being slightly further back (perhaps a couple of inches) ..overall ingress was much easier. Without such things as the aforementioned USB port being fitted to the underside of the dashboard, I had more room to move. Not a lot but still an inch or two when previously there was none feels like liberation ! The right leg was similarly pulled in and unfolded down to the throttle, where I found half an inch clearance between the brake pedal and the side of the footwell - ample ! This seat was only a bit further back than those on Mike’s car but with the seat back's slimmer padding every fraction of an inch helps. Rich helped with the ignition key (a matter of knowing the technique) and then I started her up. What a difference ! ..the audio arrangement peaked to a brief but wonderful crescendo of revs with the sharper tones of a stainless exhaust system. Throttle pickup seemed quicker but in truth I couldn’t say that was fact or just that it sounded so, with the louder tone and it being an open top. It wasn’t at all offensive a sound track, just a very different orchestra with more brass rather than bass guitar. First impressions of Mike’s TR4A was that the clutch was heavy to operate, but perhaps that was because of my being so tightly confined, because I never noticed it as soon as we were on the road. Rich’s TR4 didn’t seem so from the outset. I soon found reverse and eased the car out into the road. Rear visibility wasn’t of course an issue but I was trying to pull out from between parked cars. Someone kindly stepped out into the road to guide me, again I think that was Mike. Thank you Sir. And then I was gone.. I had looked 200 yards down the road and I was there, spot on where I wanted to be ..correctly positioned to see further along the road. It seemed like an instant and the thought crossed my mind that I might have seemed a bit reckless in someone else’s car, so I eased off. The feel of this car was different. No better and no worse than the 4A just different. Perhaps that was because of it being open, the rasp of the exhaust note and the seemingly faster engine pick-up (both cars have lighten flywheels), or just because I felt more anxious about driving someone else superb-condition TR4 for the first time on my own. An oncoming car sped around a corner and seemed very much over the middle of the road to me. The leather sleeve over this steering wheel moved a little as I responded, and then the branches of hedgerow trees seemed a little close. I slowed a little to ‘be sensible’ ..but in truth I was a little too anxious to enjoy this drive as much as I had been with Mike’s quiet reassurance. Mike had been chatting as I drove his car, and I gathered by the tone in his voice that he wasn’t terrified. But now I was driving Rich’s car and if something happened, even if that wasn’t directly my fault, then how the heck might I explain it.? Still it was great fun and exhilarating. Does this car have lighter handling, or was the live rear axle giving a little more feedback on these undulating sometimes adversely cambered unclassified roads ? Just a degree difference in tracking adjustment &/or a few pound in tyre pressure can make things feel lighter, and of course here I was driving solo, so the weight and its distribution was also slightly different. My test drive was too short to ascertain what was what. The word, reputedly from the racing boys, is that the TR4 chassis is better when pushed hard. Perhaps the 4A’s IRS is more forgiving for the novice ..but in skilled hands has lower limits.? Conversely I might just have felt a bit more vulnerable in an open top.? Although I ride motorcycles, I’m trying to remember when I last drove an open top car ? Many years ago it seems. Certainly Rich’s TR4 was more spacious ..both physically and visually airy (..white dashboard, which I do like, and with a very nice almost Wedgewood blue hue to the upholstery) ..and equally as comfortable as the 4A. So I relaxed a little and simply enjoyed the drive, the feel, and this engine’s superb response. I felt an instant rapport with Mike’s 4A but perhaps the TR4 takes a little more getting used, or was it that by now I was just thinking too much and felt someone else’s car in such exemplary condition was too precious to really enjoy ? I returned in a civilized manner and easily turned in to park. The engine ticked over beautifully before I switched off. The handbrake lever in the foot well was (again surprisingly) not an issue for my long legs, and its operation felt perfectly natural to me. I lifted myself out of the car with ease. With the seat runners just another 2” or 3" further back then I don’t think I’ll have issues with living with a TR, but the full-size banjo steering wheel, even though I prefer its look - feels less responsive to drive with. Though it is easier for parking-speed tight maneuvers. All in all - each car is BLOODY FANTASTIC ! ..no doubt it is the car I want. I’m of a freakish size but even with inappropriately wide shoes and restrictive seat runner positions I can drive these cars safely and have more fun than I’ve had (when driving) for very many years. As and when I get my car (..an abandoned-project 4A) I can make things easier for ingress and getting out : the size and dish of the steering wheel, the padded capping on the door, the choice of seat and its runners, clearing the underside of the dashboard, the door handles positions, and the pedal spacing., are the most obvious. All in all the TR is a seat-of-the-pants sports car which is so incredibly capable. My Jaguars were elegant, comfortable, fast and sublime ..but the TR4 / 4A communicates directly with me ..and is just so much fun. Massive thanks to both Rich and Mike for letting me experience their fabulous cars in person. My own car will never be as pristine (..nor so precious) as theirs, but I hope it might achieve similar all-round competence as their cars amply demonstrated. I'm smitten ! Pete
  8. 2 points
    Hi Marco, Many thanks for your recommendation to visit Villa del Balbianello whilst we were at Lenno on Lake Como, it was spot on - it was a short walk from hotel Lenno up a rather steep incline in 32C but well worth it to see the villa, it's absolutely stunning gardens and views: From Como we drove north to Lake Lucern, again with spectacular views Regards Andrew & Bev
  9. 2 points
    Our group, Clyde Valley have a stand at this show, come and say hello, cheers Ian.
  10. 2 points
    Richard-- The baffle box is thin alumin(i)um, and it was spot welded to the cover. Some more pics here, about halfway down the page under "Crankcase Ventilation". http://bullfire.net/TR6/TR6-116/TR6-116.html Ed
  11. 2 points
    Atlantic Bridge to Seil Island on our way back to Oban this afternoon. Just by chance we bumped into Steve Hall ( TR Enterprises ex ) in the pub here, he is off racing in Ypres tomorrow.
  12. 2 points
    Hello All Not a TR but Still a Triumph! Roger & The Memsahib
  13. 2 points
    Thanks to everyone that replied. The battery was shot. The three hour turning off and on in the very slow traffic queue at the tunnel helped to bury it ... and the same thing around the town in Laon laid it to rest. I have since upgraded to a new battery with a much beefier ah capacity. Now turns over like a goodan ... In fact it has never started so well.
  14. 2 points
    Ian Gibson has owned almost every sort of 4-pot TR, Vanguards, Fergies and other related machinery, was my prime collaborator when I was Tech Ed in the 1970s/1980s, still has a huge amount of spares, and - for obvious reasons - is one of the members of the committee of the TR Spares Development Fund (SDF). IanG doesn't use the Forum, so I'll send George's note to him. As the SDF's small, 5-man, committee has three Ians [Gibson, Brown & Cornish] and two Gibsons [Ian & Dave], we tag our names with the first letter of our surnames. Ian Cornish
  15. 1 point
    YODA. That plate will be worth a fortune amongst the Starwars community!
  16. 1 point
    Body Off! finally get to see the state of the chassis......and it’s great. Places of original paint and shinny metal. A test clean up of the frame and now to strip it. Engine and box out next. Body covered in rust primer and now wrapped for the summer while I deal with the chassis.
  17. 1 point
    Niklas and Edwin, I fear you are the unlucky victims of amateurs. A professional outfit would have dismantled the rims i.e drilled out the rivets, trued up the centres, trued the rims or replaced them where necessary and welded them back together on a jig.It's not a science as you know.The automotive industry has been doing it for over 100 years. There will be someone out there that CAN do the job properly, (I don't know of anyone offhand) but personally the route I would take would be to buy up all the cheap old second hand TR rims that you see for sale for peanuts, and select the best.Even a 25% success rate will be a cheaper option than a 'specialist'. Good luck Roger M-E
  18. 1 point
    Winter job time here and I had another look at the leak today. I'm pretty certain the cause was due to excessive end float on the operating valve shaft, I'd guess between 0.5 and 1.0mm . The seals are of rectangular cross section - approx. 2.3mm deep x 3.0mm high. For the record my seal ID is 7.85mm. My plan is to try and find a similar replacement seal in Viton, if I can't I'll reuse the original and take up the end float. I don't see how standard O rings will work due to insufficient cross section.
  19. 1 point
    Many thanks John, I had not commented but this change was really starting to bug me! Thanks to the team for all your hard work Iain
  20. 1 point
    simple fix with a jubilee clip then - plus a couple of dowels? Peter W
  21. 1 point
    On my 3A, brakes all re-done with new stuff, brake fluid squirts out the pin hole on top of the reservoir. Not much, just enough to take the paint off part of the lid. On the one in the picture, from my TR3, PO must have had the same problem. He soldered the curly copper tube over the hole and I’m assuming that would prevent the little squirt from ruining the paint. Good point about clearing the bonnet. It does with about an inch to spare. On the TR3, It’s a long way off but I’m switching to dot5 when the time comes. So the curly copper tube will just be a conversation piece. By then I’ll have thought up a good lie or two about it too. Current status pics
  22. 1 point
    Roger made me do it officer !!
  23. 1 point
    You need to apply pressure to the taper for it to grip & oil on the threads to reduce friction. I have this king of problem all the time, sometimes I get around it by putting a length of wood between the ball joint and the wheel arch & jacking up the lower suspension arm until the taper grips. Harvey S. Maitland
  24. 1 point
  25. 1 point
    Hi Angus i have a ‘mongrel’ tr6 with a similar spec in many ways, and as Tom says i get about 25mpg average and 30mpg when driven gently suspension wise also similar, front and rear arb and telescopic conversion, lsd, polybushes ride is a little choppy over bumps/potholes but car handles bends superbly i suggest a tune of the pi setup will remove the driveability issues, mine pulls smoothly from 1500 revs and comes on cam at 3500 revs, pulling to 6000 enthusiastically hth steve
  26. 1 point
  27. 1 point
    Hi Tim, You have TR4a front arms on the rear deck ( where the come forward and weld to the B posts. These are thinner than the backlight which was designed for the TR4, the backlight fits all 4/4a/5/6 models but because they have different type hood frames, with attached front hood capping, the frames need more space to fold down. This means the second stud back on each side back from the b post position on the backlight, needs removing ( there is no hole in the rear deck forward arms for it to fit through). Well known original fitting mod. The backlight will then fit on the rear deck fine on the existing holes and studs. Mick Richards
  28. 1 point
    I'm very pleased you enjoyed it!
  29. 1 point
    But why did it happen? rgds Ian
  30. 1 point
    Mike get your carer to crop the photo like the tutorial you had
  31. 1 point
    Just fitted a pair of LED H4 bulbs to my '3 Very impressed. I previously was using Osram Night Breaker Halogen bulbs, lamp units are The modern Valeo (Cibie) type Photos showing comparison (see titles) LED bulb LED dip Night Breaker dip LED main Night Breaker main They come with a separate electronics box, but it all fits withing the headlamp shell. They came from "Classic car LEDs" no connection, just a satisfied (regular) customer. Bob.
  32. 1 point
    Hi Chris, Wrapping the tank will make things worse, you need cooling fins on the tank:) once the fuel temperature is higher than the boot temperature. The heat which rises the fuel temperaturr is created by energy dissipation from the Bosch pump. Unless it is very hot in the boot, which could well be in SA. A bag of frozen peas or ice comes to mind. I assume you have an inlet filter, it looks pretty small. I would increase the size, also from the hoses from tank to pump. There are many posts on this forum on (Bosch) fuel pump issues, do a search via Google. Also about permeability from fuel hoses that are not suitable for ethanol containing fuel. Cheers, Waldi
  33. 1 point
    Hi Kev, I didn't miss out on the drams. I think the Stoat would have seen off any decent Haggis Roger
  34. 1 point
    I get squealing when I go round corners, but she goes back to sleep on the straight bits Bob.
  35. 1 point
    I agree don't go below 25% tank in fact I keep it at a minimum of 40% of fuel which I know means you are always dragging that weight around but it works for my TR6 even in very hot weather ( like last summer) and I run a Lucas pump !
  36. 1 point
    While you are waiting to fit the Strombergs why dont we talk about what is going on with the dcoe's ?. I totally agree that outside of the UK it is very hard to find someone with the knowledge, parts and equipment to set them up but it is not impossible and many of us have done it. I solved a multitude of issues with my config by setting the fuel height correctly and blocking off the accelerator pump bypass. For the TR6 there is probably a fairly narrow set of emulsion tube and jet options that will vary based on other factors like cam and compression ratio. Stan
  37. 1 point
    The cheaper they are the easier they are to sell. And seeing I have owned them for 10 years I am not losing out. Had my moneys worth. But as I said. I have to install the strombergs first. If I am happy the way they run then the webers will be sold. So keep your eyes open. End of August I will advertise them here. I am in Croatia so the postage will not be cheap. Another reason for me to sell them at a good price.
  38. 1 point
    The soft top seal stays on the screen, the hardtop has a very shallow H section on its front held in place with screws and screw cups. Iain
  39. 1 point
    Assuming new clean fuel in float chambers and the car ran before being parked and the settings have not been messed with. Our tried and tested method is remove all plugs. Heat the tips of them all with a blow torch. Refit using gloves! Try to start in ordinary choke staring way. If still no go ..... drain water and refill with hot water. Remove and heat plugs again. Try again with fresh battery or even second battery as a jump start. If no go shew it the tow rope and the Land Rover. If still no go I'll give 50 quid for it as a non runner...... Peter W
  40. 1 point
    For the more anal among us, there is a type of taper pin that is threaded on the small end, so the pin is pulled into its tapered bore. Still requires taper reaming with the parts assembled. I really believe that this pin eliminates the need for the stock one, but I have both installed anyway. Ed
  41. 1 point
    As it’s a nice day and I needed pictures for the insurance agreed value I took these that I thought I would share.
  42. 1 point
    I'm delighted to see that Peter Cobbold is contributing once again - I am one of a great many who has missed his excellent and erudite contributions. Ian Cornish
  43. 1 point
    I know that I might be considered biased, as I have known Neil since 1976 (when he undertook all the engineering drawings for the Technicalities booklet) and he re-built 4VC for me in 1990-1993, but every modification and improvement which he has produced over a great many years for TRs has been thoroughly researched, engineered and tested by himself, before ever he markets it. Unlike Triumph and some other car producers, he doesn't use customers as the primary testers for his wares! In the case of the coil over shocks for IRS TRs I know that he has had special shocks produced because a shorter stroke is required. I have no experience of this system as my TR4 has a wonderfully crude system of uprated leaf springs and larger lever arm shockers - and the rear wheels stay upright all the time! As can be appreciated from this video, and his personal involvement as sponsor and participant in the Sprint & Hill Climb Championship, his testing is far tougher than 99% of TR owners could ever achieve, and the results speak for themselves. For certain, he doesn't hang about! Ian Cornish
  44. 1 point
    Top work, thanks for sharing, really enjoying the updates! Gareth
  45. 1 point
    Best way to bleed them is to go to Halfords and buy one of the Gunston pressure bleeders that you connect to a tyre so you don't need to do the up/down thing with the pedal and upset you other half in the process. It also much better at driving out air bubbles. I always start at the lowest one first to chase the air 'uphill'.
  46. 1 point
    Thanks for the reply. Very interesting. Especially the handling /brake side of things and that much of it is standard. I suppose that you have to think so quickly in the v8 the 4 gives you the time to think. Every thing is relative tho !! stay safe and enjoy. H
  47. 1 point
    Slightly off topic, but I use Mintex 1144 on my 2.5 saloon, and they are excellent for fast road work. Great bite and they never fade! Matt
  48. 1 point
    Drove from Notts to Abersoch this morning...250 miles Roof down, cool start and Sunshine Finish....what more does a man need..
  49. 1 point
    Hi Chris, Yes they are centre lock although I am not sure if they come in 4.5, I was recommended to speak to Ed at Frontline Developments ed@frontlinedevelopments.com Worth getting in touch with them if interested. Regards Paul
  50. 1 point
    Here's a pdf of the talk: https://supertrarged.wordpress.com/2017/07/10/how-does-an-su-carburettor-work/ There's information about SUs ( and Stromberg CDs) that will probably be new even to most SU experts: 'mixture spread'. ======== May I thank those of you who braved the sauna-like conditons in the Friesen Shed. And may I apologise that you could not hear me. I do not have a loud voice and the PA for the arena defeated my best efforts. In my defence I had requested months before that a lapel mic and amp-loudspeaker be provided. It was not there. So I have suggested to the powers that be that the club invest in its own portable kit, along the lines of that owned by our local U3A (membership about 400). For me it was a disappoiting experience having spent several hundred hours trying to fathom SUs and at least 100 constructing the talk. In 2015 the organisation of the Malvern facilities was impeccable ( thank you Ian again) Something has gone wrong this year. I'm not sure I'd want to repeat last Saturday's experience at Lincoln 2018. Peter
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