Jump to content

Leaderboard


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/05/2019 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    I've already posted to 'Out and About, but thought I might drop this here too. Delighted to report that my TR4A made it to my daughters wedding (and back)! Why surprised? ......Well, it's been off the road for 15 years, I purchased it as a project but I was just not getting around to it. Then my daughter challenged me to get it going over just a few months, as her wedding transport - with no plan B allowed! I started trying to refurb brakes and clutch units - but they turned out to be just a bit beyond rescue and so threw a credit card at new complete parts and pipes - still trying to get a perfect 'bleed' - probably expecting too much. Carbs were well worn - so I did a major rebuild on those - well worth the effort. Fuel tank had perforated beyond hope - but managed to find an earlier model one for £10! It too had a few small holes but I used a Frost kit to seal it - what a messy job that is! After a new fuel line, change oil and filter and sorting out a flooding aft float chamber the TR started straight away. One sticking valve caused a bit of concern - but seems to have got a bit freerer with a bit of use. Head rebuild planned soon. Had masses of help from this forum - thanks everyone!
  2. 2 points
    . But it's now a rolling restoration rather than another long-term (unfinished) project - which makes all the difference ..as long as you keep it rolling ! Well Done that man .
  3. 2 points
    Delighted to report that my TR4A made it to my daughters wedding (and back)! Why surprised? ......Well, it's been off the road for 15 years, I purchased it as a project but I was just not getting around to it. Then my daughter challenged me to get it going over just a few months, as her wedding transport - with no plan B allowed! I started trying to refurb brakes and clutch units - but they turned out to be just a bit beyond rescue and so threw a credit card at new complete parts and pipes - still trying to get a perfect 'bleed' - probably expecting too much. Carbs were well worn - so I did a major rebuild on those - well worth the effort. Fuel tank had perforated beyond hope - but managed to find an earlier model one for £10! It too had a few small holes but I used a Frost kit to seal it - what a messy job that is! After a new fuel line, change oil and filter and sorting out a flooding aft float chamber the TR started straight away. One sticking valve caused a bit of concern - but seems to have got a bit freerer with a bit of use. Head rebuild planned soon. Had masses of help from this forum - thanks everyone!
  4. 2 points
    Well done and great picture. I'm sure with time she will get the grease stains out of that wedding dress. Stan
  5. 1 point
    Hi Guys, Having constructed a jig to allow my TR4A project body tub to be rolled over through 360 degrees, I will be finished with the jig in the next month or so. Rather than throw the construction away, if anybody's interested in it then I will happily let them have it. Its been so much easier to work on, (getting too old to weld upside down now!) I am in Weymouth where it can be seen if anybody is interested.
  6. 1 point
    Father and son restoration of a 1964 TR4. Previous episodes and weekly update videos on their YouTube Channel, here : Wegs Garage YouTube. Cheers, Deggers
  7. 1 point
    Riche, Welcome to the forum re starting . Check the points gap...starting can gradually get worse. re oil.....welcome to this gem of TR lore: https://www.snic-braaapp.com/spinaltappets/Tappetstry/Spinal Tappets - While My TR Gently Leaks.mp3 Peter
  8. 1 point
    Well done Roger, now you can take your time to finish off all the unseen bits Roger
  9. 1 point
    My recent battle with the mysterious misfire was extended for a while when the bonnet was stuck in the closed position. Not caused by the usual cable problem. In my frustration with the misfire I allowed the bonnet to slam shut instead of lowering gently. It bit back and the pin and collar went beyond the tube on the underside of the latching mechanism, and stayed there. Fortunately TRGB's previous experience and expertise was able to spring it free again, much to my relief. I was at the point of believing that the only solution was the angle grinder! TRGB then fitted a TR5/TR6 item which has a slightly longer tube which prevents this type of lock down happening again. I imagine that most owners are not even aware that this tube exists, can't be seen when the latch bracket is bolted to the bulkhead. My strong advise is to change/extend the original tube for the 5/6 spec length.
  10. 1 point
    Finally cured the misfire. It was a white gunge, consistency and appearance similar to silicon sealant. Not really sure what it was, but presume it was introduced in a bad batch of fuel? The bulk of the gunge was in the pipe between tank and carbs and because it was semi fluid it allowed only small quantities of fuel and compressed air to flow. After several attempts I believe I have finally got rid of it. Thanks for all the helpful suggestions.
  11. 1 point
    Excellent. Nothing like a bit of encouragement and something to aim for to concentrate the mind! Well done. Rog
  12. 1 point
    Ah the Lucas 6RA relays. I have spent a lot of time collecting a few of these relays to put on my TR. The horn relay is no longer available from the Triumph suppliers. Mine is an R246 made in Bedworth England. As Tony says above the horn push connects to W1. Then I don't think it really matter which way round you connect C1 and C2 because that is the switched circuit. W1 goes through the winding and then earths on the body of the relay. If you take the cover off you will see how it works. So in the absence of a direct replacement you can use another type of Lucas 6RA relay. Beware however because just because it says 6RA doesn't mean it is the right one. 6RA refers to a generic group of relays. The one to find is one with the numbers 33213, 33293 or 33302 followed by a letter. After the numbers it say 12v and then the next 3 or 4 numbers tell you the week and year of manufacture. For example 33213J 12v 4571 or 33293A 12v 568. The mounting bracket should be on the side of the casing what Lucas call H1 type housing. H2 have the bracket on the top and H3 don't have a bracket at all. I believe these relays are also fitted to Triumph Stags. These relays are 'normally open' types which means there is no connection between C1 and C2 until you power up the winding. Note some relays have a double Lucar connector for C1 and some have single but doesn't affect how you wire it up. I think this relay is also the same as part number 142169A or type SRB101 or SRB111. So fit the 6RA relay to the car. Connect horn push to W1 and connect W2 to earth. Connect main power supply to C1 (this has an in line fuse) and C2 to horns. If you prefer one with the bracket on the end opposite the terminals then the number on the relay will be 33311 (also called SRB112) with maybe a letter D after the number. Wiring will be the same. Looks better (more period) than the modern plastic types I think. Although many early Triumphs didn't have a horn relay I would recommend you use one to protect the horn push circuit that has thinner wires. Try to get the one you have working. They are pretty simple devices. Beware also that also included under the 6RA 'umbrella' are 24v as well as 12v types and others are normally closed and there are also 'change-over' circuit types. Keith
  13. 1 point
    Common fault is earthing the casing. Double check that. Beyond that you can open it up and clean the mechanism of contacts and solenoid arm. They look so much more Cpt Nemo than a modern plastic relay. Peter W
  14. 1 point
    If you use that new relay the pin connections are numbered rather than lettered. The equivalents are 85 =W1, 86=W2 (the earthed body of your Lucas relay) , 30=C1, 87=C2
  15. 1 point
    Hi Roger (Owen). The Lucas relays uses the following terminology: C means contact so C1 and C2 are each a contact that are connected when the relay is powered. W means winding so W1 and W2 are the ends of the winding. The three connection horn relay joins W2 to one of the contacts internally (I don't remember if it connects to C1 or C2), so only shows terminals labelled W1, C1 and C2. This normally means you have a single supply to the relay at whichever of the Contacts is internally connected to the Winding. Then W1 connects to the horn push and the remaining Contact terminal connects to the horn. It is relatively simple to determine which Contact is internally connected to the winding: 1. Connect W1 to the -ve of a 12 volt battery, 2. Connect the +ve battery terminal to C1. If the relay clicks, C1 is directly connected to the winding, 3. If it doesn't click, then connect +ve to C2 and the relay should click showing that C2 is connected to the winding. I hope that helps Kind regards Tony
  16. 1 point
    In answer to your question yes mine was restored 26 years ago now and has been used in all weathers and Im no polisher, the chassis and underside which was done the same way as I always do them as illustrated earlier in this thread and has had a good drowning in waxoyl several times over the years is still as good as when it was done, your welcome to come and inspect it anytime you like. (FWIW Bondarust name means the same as POR15 which for those who dont know means "Paint over Rust!") Stuart. Stuart.
  17. 1 point
    Without warranty! Browse at eBay for "Volvo V40 / S40, Mk 1, 4 studs, 125/90 R 15"
  18. 1 point
    Is an emergency spare tyre not allowed at GB? I have been told some tyres from for example small Volvos fit. Me myself I have a sealant and 12 V compressor on board. Cioa / Cheers, Marco
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Please familiarise yourself with our Terms and Conditions. By using this site, you agree to the following: Terms of Use.