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  1. RogerH

    RogerH

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  3. iain

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  4. Crawfie

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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 03/02/2020 in all areas

  1. 9 points
  2. 9 points
    Languishing in Kernow, until the troubles are over. Cheers, Deggers
  3. 7 points
  4. 7 points
    Today, the British Motor Museum held a press launch to unveil its latest, most exciting exhibit. Ken Timms Chairman of Board of Trustees at the British Motor Museum and David Stocker, Trustee for The National Heritage Memorial Fund announced the addition of MVC 575 to the collection at Gaydon. The Museum now own the car, thanks to a £250,000 grant from the National Heritage Memorial Fund (NHMF). This historic Triumph TR2 broke the land speed record for two-litre production cars in Belgium, on the Jabbeke Highway. On that day in 1953 and with Ken Richardson at the wheel, it made the Triumph TR sports car a household name around the world. We covered the rebuild extensively in TR Action Magazine, was there at the launch of the restoration at the RAC Club in Pall Mall and even took it back to Jabbeke in 2017. Today marked an exciting moment in the life of this iconic TR. Video below, full article here: https://www.tr-register.co.uk/article/2020/03/0220/Jabbeke-TR2-arrives-at-British-Motor-Museum
  5. 6 points
    The 4 faces of my TR3a the soft top topless with aero screens top less with full screen hardtop. these cars have so many personas forgive the multiple pictures Mike.
  6. 6 points
  7. 6 points
    Well, I thought it was very very funny. In these dull times any mirth is welcome - keep them coming. Roger
  8. 5 points
    John Yes I do listen to the TV and radio It told me that people who exhibit symptoms were being tested. How true is that? Only a few know Early action only delays. Take Germany. Today their health minister (I think it was) stated that there will be a big increase in CV19 deaths. Germany got lucky, testing early, mainly, it turn out the young fit and healthy skiers, returning from holiday; not my words . . His. Thus their figures are skewed. I stated the obvious because it needed stating. The media are screaming about the lack of PPE and they are right, there is a lack, but, the gov't we have is the best of a bad job, the alternative being JC. I don't think they are deliberately making themselves public enemy No1, there is a tonne of kudos and years in power on offer if they get it right, why would they not want that? I don't excuse anyone John, not my place. I mearly offer what I see as a reasonable counter to your position. Is your position wrong? I don't know. Is mine wrong? I don't know. Only time will tell. What I will say is, that being constantly negative, without offering positive counters, does no one any favours. It's a problem the BBC have but havn't yet recognised. If someone constantly cries wolf, the audience stops listening. I note that you ignored my last comment . . . I rest my case.
  9. 5 points
  10. 5 points
  11. 5 points
    My cousin sent me the attached - Absolutely brilliant. Enjoy. The Ladybird Book of COVID-19.pdf.pdf.pdf.pdf.pdf.pdf.pdf.pdf.pdf.pdf.pdf.pdf.pdf.pdf
  12. 5 points
    No only a pair of TR4 doors and a couple of boots
  13. 5 points
  14. 5 points
    !!! This was Crawfie’s ‘winning post’ over in the Inn. (HOSWPLW 3)............ Bizarre Acie how you can possibly get upset about it? You've clearly fundamentally misunderstood something, happy to explain further if it helps Best regards Tony
  15. 5 points
    A pleasure to "cross swords " and I certainly a few laughs along the way.
  16. 5 points
    For your information Acaie (?) there never was any such debate. Just a little jesting - that is all - carried over from a different thread. Why are some people so intent on seeing offence that they cannot understand or recognise a little light-hearted humour when it is exercised?
  17. 5 points
    The TR Spares Development Fund (SDF) is delighted to announce that, following a considerable gestation period, the units are now boxed, in stock and on sale from Pete and Tom (his son) Cox at Pete Cox Sportscars in Redditch. Full details can be found below , with the price and contact details for purchase. Yet another success for the SDF, which exists to: "Preserve the Marque and keep TRs on the road". I must apologise that my attempts to upload a photo have failed - will try again tomorrow! Ian Cornish, SDF Chairman TR Spares Development Fund (SDF) Early TR2 Thermostat Housing The early TR2s feature a couple of items which have not been available for years, one being the double thermostat housing fitted before TS1201E, Part 201522/105584. This assembly is pictured in the left shot on page 72 of Bill Piggott’s invaluable tome, “Original Triumph TR2/3/3A”, but depicts the housing with a blanking plate in place of a filler cap. A filler was fitted to the housing on TS1 and TS2, the first left-hand and right-hand drive TR2s, but it was found unsatisfactory because the top of the filler lay below the top of the radiator. Thereafter, a blanking plate was fitted to the housing and the radiator was provided with a rearward- and upward-facing projection to bring the filler above the top of the radiator. Because these housings are well over 60 years old and were cast from decidedly inferior material, many developed leaks, and, even if they didn’t leak, some early owners decided to replace them with the later and more familiar unit, depicted in the right shot (Part 202033/203781). As it was clear that there was a demand for the original housing amongst those keen on originality, the SDF decided to investigate re-manufacture, in superior materials and to a high standard. This project has been the baby of Christoph Mathey (in Switzerland) and Pete Cox, to whom the SDF owes a deal of thanks for doggedly working for more than two years to bring matters to a most satisfactory conclusion. The new housings have been cast in aluminium, which then has been machined. The filler/neck plate is zinc plated; the bolts, nuts and lock washers are bright zinc plated. The studs are not coated, but only the tips are visible. The units are complete with their 2 gaskets, studs, nuts, bolts and washers, and are boxed. In addition, an extra two sets of (spare) gaskets are supplied in a small plastic bag in each box, plus (for those who may not wish to utilise the filler/overflow) a drilled and plated triangular blanking plate as shown in the photo in Bill’s book. To minimise the risk of damage in transit, the filler/overflow has been rotated 120º anti-clockwise, the unit placed in a sealed plastic bag, and the box filled with lightweight packing material. Thermostat and radiator cap are not included because purchasers will have these already, but Pete Cox advises that the cooling system of the 4-pot, wet-liner TR engine should have a cap with a rating not exceeding 7 lbf/in2. The purchaser can decide whether to fit the housing as supplied, making the car appear as TS1 and TS2 were produced originally, or remove the filler/overflow and fit the included triangular blanking plate, as shown in the first photo from Bill’s book. This reproduction is of a quality far exceeding that of the original, and can be expected to have a life of at least a hundred years, which should be good news to the great grandchildren of current owners! Production has been limited to 50 units, and these are on sale as Part Number 201522KIT – it will be first come, first served, and when they’ve gone ..... The units are available from Pete and Tom Cox at Pete Cox Sportscars https://petecoxsportscars.co.uk/ email: enquiry@petecoxsportscars.co.uk Unit 25, Peltland Trading Estate, Padget’s Lane, South Moons Moat, Redditch, B98 0RB Phone: 01527 522646 (Work hours), 07932 716229 (Tom) and the price is £234 (£ sterling) plus carriage.
  18. 4 points
    And someone sent me this little gem. Rgds Ian VID-20200330-WA0004.mp4
  19. 4 points
    In the Wilds of the Welsh Hills. Conrad.
  20. 4 points
    Here’s mine, currently having a rest! ........ Andy
  21. 4 points
    Hope to get it to IOM in September
  22. 4 points
  23. 4 points
  24. 4 points
    I have been contacted by a TR Forum member who is restoring an early TR2. He asked if I would make him a pair of bonnet catches complete with their inner wing platforms. As you can see from the pictures the prototype items have been made. My thanks to Daniel Morris in Honolulu!!! for supplying me with a rare original set to copy. My intention is to complete one off, small batch, of catches and/or platforms. The price for the twin bonnet catches will be about £340 for a pair, the cost for the handed inner wing platforms will be approximately £100 a pair. Please contact me if you would like further information. Regards Russell
  25. 4 points
    The problem with a die nut or a but with slots cut in is getting it started. If the first few threads are damaged you may well end up damaging more threads The picture below came up on the TSSC forum last year. It is a clamp of hardened split nuts You clamp it in the middle where the threads may well be OK and unwind to clean the start threads. Genius - but long gone. Roger
  26. 4 points
    I couldn't waste a beautiful day like this, so did a 60 mile circular loop out to Avebury and back, across the Berkshire and Wiltshire downs (no roof, aeroscreens only). In the odd dip the roads were flooded where there's run-off from the fields, so I managed to get my right elbow soaked by an inconsiderate oncoming driver who didn't slow down through one watersplash. TRs are very low down compared to the ubiquitous Chelsea tractor ! The photo isn't from today but is on the route I took. This is the Chute Causeway (Roman road) north of Andover.
  27. 4 points
  28. 4 points
    Unashamedly stolen from the TSSC forum - Paddy goes to the toilet at work but doesn't return for about 20 minutes. "Where have you been all this time?" asked the boss. "Washing my hands, I forgot the words to Happy Birthday so sang Bohemian Rhapsody twice" he replied Thank you TSSC. Roger
  29. 4 points
    Thats why the factory leaded at that point to correct this, pretty much every one Ive done needed this. This is a 5 but same applies, often a little on the bottom of the boot lid helps too Stuart.
  30. 4 points
  31. 4 points
    Had a lovely drive to Penrhyn Castle for coffee and cake 195 miles round trip. Mike Redrose group
  32. 4 points
    Lovely morning for a run out getting some miles on the clock, hopefully by Sunday we can change the oil from running in oil to proper engine oil. One thing I have noticed is you feel the pot holes more in a TR than you do in a 4x4 and there seams to be a lot about. Mike Redrose Group
  33. 3 points
    A different view of my 3A...
  34. 3 points
    And the three types of boots
  35. 3 points
  36. 3 points
    Rather laying my classics up for lockdown, I'm currently using them in rotation for essential trips to the shops. This is of course allowed under the current restrictions but I realise the police may pull me over suspecting I'm simply out for pleasure. I take a shopping list and carrier bags, which should provide some evidence that my journey is essential. Nigel
  37. 3 points
    Car park near Moretonhamstead, Dartmoor.
  38. 3 points
    My ‘6 all polished and nowhere to go.
  39. 3 points
    Latest Update: 27 March 2020. This thread is an ongoing experiment. What follows conveys the original story, pieced together as it develops. Starting from the initial, vital, clue. If it reads like a diary, it's because it is a diary, a blow-by-blow account of the breakthroughs, not excluding red herrings, the kind of twists and turns anybody asking questions is more than likely to encounter. It also experiments with the design capabilities of the Forum software, stretching them to the limit, to make the most of a tool which allows more scope than I had imagined. Latest Updates add new pieces of the puzzle and appear at the bottom, clearly signposted. Taken by Surprise I got a message from E. Meason, a really friendly TR Register member, from Glasgow, in the Clyde Valley Group. A few weeks ago, Meason spotted a period photograph of KST 277, parked outside a Standard Triumph Dealership in Inverness, Scotland. He was curious. After all, most Scottish registered cars would have rotted away by now. Could it have possibly survived? So he checked on the DVLA website and realized that yes, the car had actually survived. When he saw the first thread about KST 277, he decided to get in touch. As he said himself: Facebook photo. Well, he did! You can just imagine my surprise, when I read his private message. Vodafone made it more exciting still. There you are, desperately pressing all the buttons, scrolling, rolling your fingers, but no. It wasn't that straightfoward to see this photograph out of the blue, this blast from the past. I had to go on their website littered with adverts and notices. Still no joy. So, feeling very shy and rather nervous, I overcame my reluctance and phoned E. Meason. He told me a little about his own TRs, and how he got involved at 16. A lifetime. This was the first time I'd spoken to a Club member for years. Same kindness, same shared passion. Once again, I felt a sense of gratitude, that unique club sense of belonging, what Eli calls the "Triumph Family". By the end of the phonecall, I heard myself say: och aye. I did. Honest. I tried again. Eventually, Lo and Behold!... this photo appeared: ■ Digital photograph taken by E. Meason with a mobile phone of a digitized photograph, on Facebook. I tweaked the small image as best I could, to get rid of the screen lines and see if I could improve the quality. Can you believe it? You can read the 1956 Inverness registration and the same year and location on the registration of the car behind it, KST 845. So small an image. Might it just be possible to skip Facebook and get to its original source? Worth a try. Watermark On closer inspection, I noticed a watermark bang in the centre. The faint white lettering was just about visible... baile, home or even hometown, in Scots Gaelic, like baihle in Irish. But I couldn't make out the first two letters. So I did a search, and ambaile appeared as I scrolled the page further down. Turns out it is the Inverness Museum site, Highlands Cultural Archive or something, and its photographic collection. Inverness Standard Triumph Dealership I typed in J. Ferries and Standard Triumph and this is what came up: ■ Distributers [sic.] for Standard Triumph, Citroen, David Brown. Then I found the very same photograph, on the Inverness Museum website, larger than the Facebook reproduction Meason sent me. Big enough to notice several details. For one thing, the registration number, and the one of the car behind it, KST 845, today belonging to a red Rolls Royce, as I discovered on the DVLA site belong to two cars which were bought more or less at the same time. The TR3 first, before mid-August 1956. And here they are, parked on the same kerb. When was it taken? Late 1956? Early 1957, most probably. ■ Online, Inverness Museum site. More details emerge. I tried to identify all those badges on the bar. When I enlarged the image, I was able to see that the one on the far left and still on the car today, but on the grille -- the bar is long gone -- is a Standard Triumph Owners' Association Club badge. You can tell, from how the light captures the two curved tops. ■ TSOA badge. And there are several others, including what looks like a rally plate, judging by its shape. Maybe not? Just guessing here. But there is also a spotlight and a foglight. ■ Lucas Flamethrowers? But look! The one on the left has lost its glass. There's also a discoloured patch on the cowling, driver's side, above the sidelight: same cause? And a similar patch on the opposite side. Is the car for sale? First owner ready to sell on? Or is it just parked on the curb, more likely, like the Sportsman, both cars awaiting their annual service, greasing and the rest, at the dealership? If I find out about this Mark Mason I'll let you know. So far, I can tell you that he moved to Spain, presumably after selling KST 277, therefore, in 2008. In Spain, he restores classic Jaguars and will be visiting Great Britain in a few months' time. TR Bitz will keep me posted and I you. □ Update: 13 March 2020 Meantime, thanks to the trail of the old photo on Facebook E. Meason sent, we can say that James Ferries was a Standard Triumph dealer who owned not one, but two garages in Inverness. But I'm jumping ahead. ■ High-res: drum brakes. Through the front wheel air vents, you can make out the edge of the drum brake, consistently with early TR3s of that period, this one built on 17 November 1955. Was it Bob (Lebro) who pointed this out? This was several months before Girling disc brakes were introduced. Yet, this TR wasn't delivered to Inverness before early August 1956, and to a dealership. But when exactly were Girling discs introduced? ■ Front TR3 cowling in more detail. The AA and Standard Triumph badges are also much clearer now, and the rally badge legible, as well as a further three more badges. Earlier, I mistook two of them for paint blemishes. More soon. □ Update: 16 March. A second garage. I've now found a second photograph on the Web, this one, below. ■ The Ferries Standard Triumph & Citroen garage and filling station. A garage for repairs, featuring an AA sign, and filling station, not a fancy showroom. But if you look carefully, you will see KST 277 parked inside. What? The same customer's TR parked in two garages belonging to Ferries Ltd? So no, not a customer's car, Ferries' car. Looks like it's in for a service or repair to the fog light. ■ Detail. Therefore, short of having Ferries' name listed on a vehicle document, which it is not, the circumstantial evidence strongly suggests that this TR3 belonged to James Ferries who was the dealer who owned both the ST Showroom and the garage at a separate Inverness address. We have a date for the second photo, 1958. Of course I am ordering a high resolution digital print. □ Update 17 March The Triumph Rally of Europe ■ Rally plate reads Triumph Rally of Europe. Incidentally, does anyone recognize the other badges? 1957 was the year Triumph started its US sales drive, involving a European tour, which KST 277 took part in, as the rally plate, now clearly visible in more detail, demonstrates. Ferries went on the first one (they ran from 1957 until 1962), but his car wasn't brand new and therefore should not have been eligible. How come? Simple, he'd already bought it. So for him, this was a junket. This rally is news to me, but surely not to most readers. Hosted by the Triumph Sports Owners Association -- Triumph’s Club -- brainchild of Mr. I. J. Penrice, the Publicity Manager, and Jack Croft, the Press Officer, as Motorsport, Vol. XXXIII, n. 5, pp. 15-16, of May 1957 informs us -- the immediate objective of these tours wasn't to sell TRs, but, above all, to get publicity and increase sales that way. The Triumph Rally of Europe, as the wording clearly shows on the plate, was an enjoyable, luxury, publicity stunt, offering a three-week organized cruise, from place to place, in a sports car, top down, on the highways of Europe. So, how did you join the Triumph Rally of Europe? To be eligible, you had to purchase a new TR3, and pick it up in person at the factory in Coventry. The additional cost included the airfare from the US, a three-week holiday, and return shipping. You stayed in five-star hotels, all meals included, as well as being taken to organized sightseeing trips. It was primarily aimed at Americans, who would fly over and collect their Triumph TR in England, licensed and tanked up. According to my friend Mike Strange, it was known as fly n' drive. On tour, at each hotel, two Standard Triumph mechanics who followed the convoy of sidescreen TRs, washed and refuelled the cars. A van carried spare parts for emergency roadside repairs. In those days, there were fewer cars about, so city traffic was light, and you could achieve high speeds on deserted open roads, as one of the participants, Mike Cook, remembers. He took part in the 1960 tour, in the company of about sixty other Triumph enthusiasts. Watching them go by must have been an impressive sight; when would you ever see a convoy of sidescreen TRs on the open road? In 2009, Cook remembered: His story ends: [Source: Mike Cook, "A Cruise on Dry Land", Hemmings Sports & Exotic Cars, March 2009]. ■ The Standard Triumph logo on a Ferries & Co. advertisement. Company records say that James Ferries Co. Ltd., was incorporated in 1946 and dissolved in 1997. Its business had been the "sale of new cars and light motor vehicles -- Other motors". ■ An advert dated 1965. Still going strong. It is not unlikely that Ferries drove the TR3 into the ground and that KST 277 sat in storage somewhere for years. Then, years later, Mark Mason bought this TR3, probably in the mid- or late- 1990s, and restored it. He had already restored a concours-winning Register TR4, according to Craig of TR Bitz. Mason's name and that of John Brindley, a well-known racing driver, appear as entry no. 1027, at the 1998 RAC Classic Rally. Mason had obviously made KST 277 a roadworthy vehicle by then, and it's a fact that he owned the car until 2008, when he sold it. This is the TR that appealed to an elderly Welshman, by the name of Geraint Pritchard. A car with 150bhp at the rear wheel, equipped with a rally cam, Weber 45s, TWM inlets, Phoenix s/s 4-into-1 exhaust manifold, 13-row Moss oil cooler, Revington oil breather catch tank, braided Goodridge brake hoses, Girling discs, diff, and half shafts, Lumenition electronic ignition, aluminium sump, alloy damper pulley conversion, high-torque starter motor, alternator, 185 Yokohamas, competition sump, gas-flowed head -- and goodness knows what else. Strange, to say the least? Not if this was someone who used to go rallying in North Wales in his youth. But one other thing is certain. Geraint Pritchard, who passed away in 2018, after a decade of great enjoyment, participating in car shows in his local Denbighshire, was the only person whose name appears in TR Register records. Consequently, KST 277 was never a club car. I asked Mike Ellis and Bill Piggott. They've never heard of it and have no documents on file, and bear in mind that Bill's archive goes back fifty years. This lack of club membership, in the UK, strongly suggests KST 277 was a barn find, gently deteriorating somewhere in Inverness, but under a dry roof. Oh, I forgot to mention that Andrea Finlayson, a very forthcoming member of staff at the Inverness Museum, told me that a colleague of hers knows someone who remembers this TR3 in the 1950s. Andrea will have a chat with him soon and we'll find out more. □ Update 17 March 2020: A confirmation What follows is a mixture of my research and Jamie's contribution. He works for the Inverness Museum. From a Hunch to the Facts James Ferries opened his motor car premises on East Gate in 1916, but was trading before then. A second premises, close by, on Millburn Road, was opened in 1937. Eventually, J. Ferries became the official Triumph distributor for the whole of north and west Scotland. The garage in the second photograph was the one listed, in Millburn Road, Inverness and the Standard Triumph fancy showroom was located on the nearby East Gate. The garage photograph was taken one day in 1958, according to Jamie Gaukroger, Am Baile Co-ordinator, of the Highland Archive Centre and Andrea's colleague. Both photographs, Jamie thinks, belong to the same photoshoot. You've seen two, but I then discovered a third. It's a rear view of KST 277. It reveals that the car was fitted with two Lucas lights, mounted on the rear bumpers, a red fog light and a white reversing light. I guessed there might be a third, after tracking down the second. Too good to be true. These accessories, taking into account the front Lucas 700s spot and fog lamps, add more substance to the view that this TR, like so many of those sold in Britain, was used for rallying. The small file-sized photograph also shows that they were publicity shots for publication, after a closer inspecton. I noticed retoucher's white paint, which has blocked out some of the background, attenuated distracting details, such as the bare winter trees in the backgound, focussing the attention on the building, and the contour of the Standard Sportsman saloon, on the far left. This used to be normal practice for black and white dot screen origination. In other words, in layman's terms, the retouching, in an era before Photoshop, was done by hand, "spotting" the white marks due to dust, and painting out unwanted features. ■ Detail Therefore, the focus of the commercial photographer's brief is not the same TR3 in all three photographs. It's Ferries & Co. Ltd. A company search reveals that J. Ferries died in 1948. So I was mistaken earlier, in assuming that he was the owner and driver. He wasn't. Couldn't be. He was long dead. Around the time of his death, as Jamie explains: Or both? "Billy Jack" is Mr. Simon William Jack (April 1935-), 21 at the date of purchase. There is a document which confirms unequivocally that KST 277 was bought by J. Ferries & Co. Ltd., not by an individual, on 14 August 1956, as the County of Inverness, Register of Motorcars informs us. This date does not appear on the BMHIT certificate or the DVLA Services site, by the way. It's new information. But the young man's father had exactly the same name, as the Inverness archivist pointed out to me. So it was Billy Jack Senior who took over Ferries, and turned it into a limited company, which Billy Jack Junior was to inherit in due course. Billy Jack was the & Co., having been James Ferries' associate for years. Hence, the car that was built on 17 November 1955 and held back, like other very early TR3s, was purchased by Billy Jack Senior, four months after Billy Jack Junior's 21st birthday. ■ County of Inverness, Register of Motorcars Period photographs and written accounts show that rallying was both popular and frequent at the time, both in Scotland and the rest of Britain. In May of that year, the Scottish Sporting Car Club’s magazine of May 1956: NB. Frank Dundas was a very active rally driver who later married Miss Innes ‘Annie’ Neil who was also a rally driver and very good, in a Standard 8. □ Latest: 19 March Update ■ High-res version of detail The sharper, better quality reproduction reveals one new clue and confirms what you could barely see in the smaller copy. The car was no. 5 in the Triumph Rally of Europe 1957, the first edition. This confirms that the front plate was more than decorative. The other detail is the Lucas L494 reverse lamp, small, but not cheap. This is mounted above the bumper, so the hole should still be visible on the bracket. Sometimes they were mounted alongside the bumper, using a different bracket. ■ L494 reverse lamp. Through the ragtop, you can see the glint of a clock and needle. I showed Mike Strang who agreed. But that's the glovebox below the grab handle, so what clock is that? ■ A Halda Speedclock? Our guess is a rally clock, though probably not this one.There should be no clock in that position on the dash, large or small on a standard car. ♤♡◇♧♤♡◇♧♤♡◇♧♤♡◇♧♤♡◇♧♤♡ Now we need to wait to hear more from Mrs. Pritchard in a month or so, and later from Mark Mason, to fill the gaps and to get answers to our questions. □ Latest Update: 20 March To be honest, I'm scraping the barrel at this stage. I have heard back from E. Meason, so I've been able to add some details, I'm waiting for the higher resolution photograph, the first one, which TR Bitz wants to blow up and display in Knutford, I have an address in Inverness for Billy Jack Junior, that is, Mr Simon William Jack (April 1935-). ■ Drum brakes, not discs. When I looked again at the medium-sized first image, I could see the edge of the front drum brake through the steel wheel ventilation holes. So this 3, which was built in November 1955, months before Girling brakes and rear axle replaced front drums and Lockheed differential, was only registered on 14 August 1956, just before the weaker rear axle prone to failure and the front drums became standard fittings for TR3s. 62 years later, it has both, courtesy of Mark Mason. ■ The badges. What I cannot identify are the three badges to the right of the Standard Triumph Association badge. Can you? However, a closer look at these photos, featuring trees with no leaves, has shown that they were taken in the winter of 1958. That same year, Billy Jack opened Farm & Household Stores Ltd. Inverness, but in the summer, on 14 August 1958. He can't have met his wife, Mrs. Fiona Mary Jack (October 1943-), she was only 15 at the time. Billy eventually closed down Ferries Co. Ltd. in 1997, to open Caledonia, which survived several economic downturns, and was renamed Inverness Leisure, a health and fitness shop, which he closed down twenty years later, in 2017. Maybe Fiona ran it. So the plan is to write to the first owner's address, enclosing a printout of this, and -- you never know -- we may be in for yet another surprise. □ Latest Update: 21 March Pathé News Triumph Rally 1957 Just when I thought I'd run out of surprises, this evening I chanced upon a Pathé newsreel of the 1957 Triumph Rally of Europe. The one Billy was in. The newsreel includes at least two TR3As, though September 1957 was the crossover date. Who would have thought it existed? It goes to show how effective Standard-Triumph's PR machine really was. ■ Pathé News Triumph Rally of Europe. The short film shows a couple of refuelling scenes, fingers pointing at maps, a youngish couple poring over one over the bonnet of their brand new TR3, filmed from inside the car, a new owner trying to figure out how to fit the tonneau, a TR with spats, TRs with hardtops, surprisingly, some RHD TRs, Paris, motorcades... The footage is not always in sharp focus, but you can read the following number plates and three of the entrants' numbers: NKV 921 no. 8, NKV 905 no. 15, NKV 893 no. 35, NKV 894, NKV 897, NKV 919, PXA 498. Why is this last registration out of sequence? A loose end is the business of those mysterious badges on KST 277's badge bar. Can you Scots in the Register find out to which clubs or associations they belong? □ Latest Update: 23 March ■ Triumph Sportsman Last night I happened to be perusing the January 1957 edition of Motorsport when a road test of the Standard Sportsman caught my eye. I skimmed the article and came to the box containing the vehicle's technical specifications and that is when I realized something was wrong. ■ Motorsport, January 1957, technical data. The Inverness County Registry of Motorcars, cited earlier gives Triumph Sports as the model name and cc. 2088, as the engine capacity. I thought it was a slip of the pen for the correct capacity cc. 1991. I was wrong. It coincided with the Sportsman or "Sports" for short. So it was the Sportsman, not the TR3, Billy Jack Senior purchased on 14 August. Not that this rules out that he also purchased the Triumph TR3 that was parked in his showroom, to give to his son. The fact remains that both motorcars were registered in August, both were for sale in Aberdeen, and both went to the only Standard Triumph Dealership in the Highlands, Ferries & Co. Ltd. It is extremely likely, but, in the light of the new facts, not a certainty. Consider also the presence of the TR3 in all three photographs. The two shots taken a few minutes apart, and the one in the other Standard Triumph garage, possibly taken the same day, but maybe not. Circumstantial detail: KST 277 is parked back to back to KST 845. One thing is certain: that the Triumph TR3 was registered no earlier than 1 August, but earlier than 14 August, given the difference in the numbers and the fact that the DVLA confirms the TR was registered in August. And finally, ask yourself this: who else, other than the exclusive Standard Triumph Regional Dealer, Billy Jack Senior, would have had the influence to have a used car accepted in the first promotional 1957 Triumph Rally of Europe, aimed primarily at North America and for new owners, when KST 277 was a two-year-old vehicle? Even so, another email to Jamie is becoming urgent, don't you think? □ Latest Update 24 March Jamie responded within less than twenty-four hours, in spite of all the hustle and bustle of moving files as the Inverness Archive staff are now working from home. The Scots are truly amazing. I was wrong. I should have knoen better. It's so important when you're handling archival documents to look at everything very carefully. I had mistakenly reached the conclusion that the entry for Messrs. Ferries & Co. Ltd. was the one for the Standard Sportsman, after spotting the Sportsman's engine capacity of 2088 where the entry should read 1991. Then Jamie kindly sent me the page for the Sportsman too. KST 845 is down as: a "Standard private" [not a goods or commercial vehicle], cc. 2088, registered by a Mr. George Allan Munroe, on 26 April 1957. ■ Wrong again. The Sportsman belonged to a Mr. Munroe. Therefore, Allan Monroe's Sportsman that day two of the photos were taken, in 1958, was in for a routine service and parked right behind Billy Jack's TR3. ■ KST 277. Described as a Triumph [...] Sports. The first number is 277, following 276, and preceeding 278. To avoid needless repetition, KST only appears at the top left hand side of the page. My lazy eye missed it. So although the clerk made a mistake in putting down the TR3's engine capacity as cc. 2088, the vehicle really was KST 277, registered by Mssrs. Ferries & Co. Ltd. on 14 August 1956. □ Latest Update 27 March More on the 1957 Triumph Rally of Europe When I referred to the the Triumph Rally of Europe as a "junket", little did I know that this was precisely how it was described in the November 1956 issue of the US published TSOA Newsletter (Vol. 2, no. 11). But that should not belittle this touring rally, and the first 1957 edition, the one Billy Jack took part in, retracing the trail of Triumph TRs Alpine Cup victories of the previous year. The first, TSOA sponsored, 1957 Triumph Rally of Europe, scheduled from 3-23 May, was: "open to all Triumph drivers looking for fun and travel." In England, Standard Triumph officials met the plane and escorted the fledgling owners to Coventry, where they toured the Canley Triumph factory and then picked up their specially prepared Triumph. On arrival at Harwich, a boat trip took participants to the Hook of Holland and to two thousand miles of driving in fourteen days through six different countries — France, Belgium, Holland, Switzerland, Austria and Germany. If someone has a collection of Road & Track, it would be nice to see the report of the Rally which appeared in: "The American Triumph Rally of Europe", Road & Track, Vol. 9 No. 1, October 1957. □
  40. 3 points
    Cheers TR Paul I wanted to add these 2 photos at the same time but they were to big. I am not that good on computers so have had to find out how to resize photos.
  41. 3 points
    It's nonsense, genetic manipulations leave tell-tale manmade sequences, which are not present in either form of the virus.
  42. 3 points
    As the sun was out this morning i went out for a 40 mile run around Cheshire, the roof definitely needs to come off now, stopped off at the Tree of Imagination for a photo. Mike. Redrose group
  43. 3 points
    Article submitted to editor of local rag, So far without response. Peter COVID-19 and D3 Professor Emeritus Peter Cobbold As a 75 year old, and a retired cell biologist, I know that I have an unacceptable existential risk from COVID-19. However, in what has turned out to be a stroke of good fortune, I was diagnosed with Parkinson's disease three years ago. It took little work on Google Scholar to uncover the huge range of broadly defensive actions of the hormone D3 ( the vitamin tag is historical). So for three years I have been taking lots of D3 supplement as it should defend my brain from several injurious processes. There is an added bonus: there are hints in the literature that I am raising my blood D3 level high enough to protect from the corona virus that causes COVID-19. There are many clinical trials of supplementing with D3 that have failed to influence 'flu, which is why your doctor cannot recommend it. So why am I reasonably confident of success? The reason is I place especial emphasis on two studies in which the blood level of D3, which is measured as 25(OH)D3 by your clinic, was raised to physiological levels. D3 is a hormone and researchers in USA have found the natural, physiological level of 25(OH)D3 to be 100 to 125 nmol/l (“ nano moles per litre”, a unit of concentration). This talk by the late Professor Robert Heaney MD describes how he and a committee of experts defined the physiological level: https://ucsd.tv/search-details.aspx?showID=29077 The two 'flu studies that meet my physiological criterion are here: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4463890/ “A colleague of mine and I have introduced vitamin D at doses that have achieved greater than 100 nmol/L in most of our patients for the past number of years, and we now see very few patients in our clinics with the flu or influenza like illness.” https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0011088 “Maintenance of a 25-hydroxyvitamin D serum concentration of 38 ng/ml or higher should significantly reduce the incidence of acute viral respiratory tract infections significantly....” (38 ng/ml is 100 nmol/L and physiological. ) We have a pretty good idea of how D3 combats microbes. D3 is a hormone that controls around 2000 genes, 10% of our genome. Amongst the 5000 research papers on D3 published per year is evidence that it promotes production of anti-microbial peptides, including cathelicidin and defensins, that attack the membranes of bacteria, fungi and enveloped viruses, and kill them. Influenza and corona viruses are enveloped. Good, the clinical findings have sound support from cell biology. My remaining question was: am I taking enough D3 supplements to reach that physiological blood level? I take lots for the Parkinson's so am well above 100-125 nmol/L, but I tell family and friends that around 2000 IU per day of D3 should be enough, or maybe 4000 IU pd for oldies who take it up less well from the gut. In USA 4000 IU per day is regarded as safe. Sunbathing before May wont make significant D3, and unless they eat a lot of oily fish, diet wont get them to 2000 IU. A tin of sardines including the oil contains about 2000 IU. Of course there is a snag: it takes 2 to 3 months for the blood level to stabilise after boosting uptake. So blood D3 rises too slowly to help anyone infected in the next month or so. D3 is not a substitute for the hygiene and social measures advised by the governments. There's more background to D3 here, in a talk I gave to the Berwyn U3A: https://u3asites.org.uk/files/b/berwyn/docs/vitamind3deficiency.pdf
  44. 3 points
    Peter this is all very interesting, but what would be the outcome of a total shut down? Massive economic distress? No herd immunity and the potential for a much more severe and later out break towards year end, where a very high percentage of the population would still be a risk on top of the normal seasonal stress the NHS struggles with? It easy for us to criticise, much harder to come up with a workable strategy to protect the bulk of the population and the economy, as much as is practical Perhaps there is some logic in the phased actions, to ensure the population does not go into a frenzy of irrational stock piling, creating unnecessary strain on our infrastructure, whilst ensuring that we all get the message.? ( subject to our media not being complete @#£” s which they appear very adept at being.) Iain
  45. 3 points
    Here she is in all her glory, earlier today: Pete
  46. 3 points
    Hi Marco, I like the way that you take on these challenges. You obviously know what you are doing but every now and then things do not go according to plan. Research & development has a great failure rate. I like playing with electronics but the amount of smoke that I have let loose is mind boggling. When it all works - Wow. That is to be savoured. Roger
  47. 3 points
    Very neat. For an even more authentic look I would use slotted screw heads. Just installed a knuckle jointed wing mirror support on the windscreen stanchion, using one of the existing screw holes and a longer (but not too long) single screw at the top of the support, strong double-sided tape under the support bracket and a glued in screw head at the bottom of the support (as I too did not want to drill into the stanchion). Seems very firm. Not claiming originality. Nicked the idea from others. Photo before the dummy screw was glued in.
  48. 3 points
    GGR 77E, my first TR4A along with my future wife Sue in Scotland 1976.
  49. 3 points
    All finished and fitted.
  50. 3 points
    Another B&W photo that TuRK's second owner (Dudley Ings) sent me - taken as the Queen Mary leaves Southampton in July 1959. Cheers, Andrew
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